Monday, December 10, 2012

Mexican wine profesionals

 
Discover our profesional website about Mexican wines: restaurants, wineries, sommeliers, wineclubs and other Mexican wine profesionals

Interested ? Look at it here:
http://winesfrommexico.homestead.com/index.html


Friday, December 07, 2012

Have you already discovered  the tasting of more than 40
wines, reds and  whites from all the Mexican wineries ?

Here you will find a valuable address on the web: http://mexicanwines.homestead.com/TASTING.html

Wednesday, December 05, 2012

Buy Mexican wine in Mexico and in the US

Where can you buy Mexican wine in Mexico and in the US ? How to buy these wines on the Internet ?  Look hereafter for interesting addresses:

Wines from Casa de Piedra
Buy through the Internet here: http://www.vinoscasadepiedra.com/


Winery Monte Xanic
Buy through the Internet here: http://www.montexanic.com.mx

Wines from the winery Chateau Camou
Here you can find them: http://www.chateau-camou.com.mx

Interested in more ? Look at the complete page here:
http://mexicanwines.homestead.com/BuyMexicanWines.html


Saturday, November 10, 2012

L.A. Cetto Cabernet Sauvignon 2009, Guadalupe Valley, Baja California




Mexico boasts the distinction of being the oldest wine-producing country in the Americas, with a history dating back to 1521, just one year after the arrival of the Spanish conquistadors. L.A. Cetto, Mexico’s largest winery, was itself established in 1975, but its origins date to Don Angelo Cetto, who arrived from Italy in 1924. Their Cabernet Sauvignon is known for its complexity of fruit flavours, balance and structure. Dry and medium bodied, it is ideal for grilled meats or beef fajitas.

Details of the tasting here: http://www.winealign.com/wines/22534-L-A--Cetto-Cabernet-Sauvignon-2009#




Thursday, November 08, 2012

L.A. Cetto One of the Largest and Most Respected Wineries


Visitors to the verdant acres of grape vines which surround L.A. Cetto winery in Baja California's Valle de Guadalupe now experience the fruits of founder Don Angelo Cetto's hard work, sacrifice and dreams. Cetto left his native Italy in 1926 and made the long journey to Baja California with the goal of bringing Mediterranean wine production to Mexico's perfect wine growing climate - warm weather, cool nights, consistent marine layer and sandy soil. One could call his impulse the lure of the terrain.


Interested ? The article continues here: http://www.bajabound.com/destinations/bajawinecountry/lacetto.php


Can Mexican wine be shipped to the U.S.?


I had a great wine in Mexico a couple of months ago and I would like to order some from a Mexican retailer. Only I can't tell if they ship to the U.S. or not. Is this usually a problem with Mexican wine retailers? And does anyone know of a good reputable Mexican wine online retailer?


The answer here: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20110521103853AAjs8ko

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Viva Mexico.


Head to Valle de Guadalupe for upscale wineries, chic hotels and a south-of-the-border answer to the French Laundry


When my friend Juan Carlos, who grew up in Tijuana, began raving about a life-altering bowl of chicken soup he'd recently eaten.
"It was at the Mexican version of the French Laundry," he said. "You know—a fancy, farm-to-table place in the middle of Mexican wine country."
I had no idea, I sheepishly admitted, there was wine country in Mexico, nor anything resembling the French Laundry. But Valle de Guadalupe is a Mediterranean microclimate in Baja California where wine has been produced for more than a century, and it's in the midst of the kind of winemaking and tourism renaissance that Napa Valley experienced in the 1970s.

Tuesday, September 04, 2012

The Wine Economist An Economist Uncorks the World of Wine Everything Old is New Again: Wine in Mexico & Turkey


Old Old and Old New
What in the world do Turkey and Mexico have in common? It is easy to generate a list of differences ranging from geography to history, language, and religion. Jim O’Neil probably included them on his list of the New BRICs because they both have relatively large populations (107 million in Mexico, 75 million in Turkey) and so substantial market potential as their middle classes expands
From a wine standpoint, Mexico and Turkey are linked by the term “oldest.” Turkey may be the oldest Old World wine producer, with evidence of wine production going back more than 6000 years. You cannot get much more “Old World” wine than Turkey, even if most people in the Old World never give Turkish wine a second thought.

Sunday, September 02, 2012

Despite obstacles, Mexico wine industry takes root


Despite a lack of recognition abroad and a drug war that has made tourists flee, Mexico's winemakers see cause to celebrate as drinking habits evolve in the land of tequila.

Production increased almost 40 percent in the past five years, causing cheer at the annual Vendimia harvest festival in Baja California, where 90 percent of Mexico's wine is produced.

The two-week fiesta was expected to welcome more than 30,000 visitors to some 40 concerts, wine-tastings and contests around vineyards lying just over an hour's drive south of the border city of Tijuana.



Thursday, August 30, 2012

Your help requested.



We're looking to bring wine to a wedding in Cabo San Lucas and need to find out if there is a limit on the bottles we can flying in with and whether there is a duty per bottle.
Any idea?


Thursday, August 09, 2012

Wine museum for Baja's Guadalupe Valley

On a swing through Baja California’s Guadalupe Valley, Mexican President Felipe Calderón on Friday inaugurated a wine museum and announced the establishment of a $3.8-million fund aimed at supporting Mexico’s wine industry.
Calderón said his administration wants to see Mexico’s wine production increase, while also encouraging tourism. “We want this to truly become one of most visited regions of Mexico,” Calderón said. 

Tuesday, August 07, 2012

Baja California: Mexico's Up-And-Coming Wine Destination

While many people know Mexico for its amazing tequila, a little known secret is the country also has a thriving wine destination: Baja California, or Baja for short. Although this sounds like it's on the West Coast of the United States, this is, in fact, an area in Mexico. The Mediterranean climate makes it ideal for producing the libation. In fact, 90 percent of the country's wine comes from the Ensenada region of Baja.

The article continues here  http://www.gadling.com/2012/07/22/baja-california-mexicos-up-and-coming-wine-destination/

Saturday, July 14, 2012

Thursday, July 12, 2012

Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Mexican wines around the world


Wine making in Mexico has come of age.  Mexican wines are competing in worldwide competition and coming away with first place ribbons. Most of the winners are coming from Baja. 

There are three major wine producing areas in Mexico, with the Baja California area producing 90% of Mexico’s wine. The city of Ensenada is at the gateway to the most famous wineries in Mexico. 


Interested? The article continues here: http://www.baja123.com/WINE_TASTING_IN_MEXICO/page_2325823.html

Thursday, July 05, 2012

History of the Mexican wines 3/4



Chapter 3: From the 19th century till World War II

At the end of the XIX th century, the Concannon family, pioneer in the Californian state (Livermore Valley, US) convinced the Mexican government to take advantage of the viticultural potential of the country and introduced a dozen French vine types and varietals in Mexico

Interested ?  Read more ...>>>

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

Experience the Mexican wines

I drove over the Mexican and American border yesterday morning, and I was thinking how close but yet so far we are from Mexico. It’s a completely different world, a fascinating one with completely different dynamics. I have a deep affection for the country. I travel there regularly.

Interested ? The article continues here: http://www.jamessuckling.com/mexican-wines-vino-mexicanos.html

Sunday, June 24, 2012

Mexico: Wine industry begins to soar


MEXICO CITY – The dry and barren landscapes of the Mexican state of Baja California – where dust blows through with little thought for those caught in its path – do not necessarily lend themselves to the notion of fertility.
It’s a land where open views are often interrupted only by rocky interludes or a solitary cactus.
Yet this dusty canvas is also home to one of Mexico’s homegrown successes.
Baja California has a temperate climate, with warm days and mild evenings, making for the perfect environment for wine production.
Despite favorable conditions, however, the Mexican wine industry still is relatively young. Many vineyards have been in operation only since the 1980s or later and are just beginning to find their feet.
The sale of Mexican wine began slowly, but in the past five years the industry has experienced something of a boom. Of the wine purchased within Mexico, three out of 10 bottles are made with national produce, according to wine aficionado website Vinisfera.com .
Efforts have been made to break down negative stereotypes regarding wine, making it more attractive to a wider market, though there is still a lot of work to be done in order to help nurture a stronger culture of wine-drinking nationwide.
As a result, the number of wine drinkers has doubled in the past five years – a boom wine critic Rafael Ibarra said “has largely been stimulated by young people.”
“Previously, those who consumed wine regularly were over the age of 50,” he added.
Mexican vineyards, which often concentrate on producing more boutique wines at the upper end of the price range, find themselves competing against more affordable foreign imports.
As a consequence, those buying wine have to ask themselves why buy a Mexican brand for US$20 per bottle when they can find a foreign brand for about US$10?




Mexican wine clubs

Wish to receive monthly suggestions about Mexican and international wines ?
Are you looking for training opportunities about wines and wineries ?
Want to join wine tasting events ?

Welcome to the wine clubs of Mexico

Monday, June 18, 2012

Have a fine Mexican wine with your meal !



In which restaurants in Mexico can you have a fine Mexican wine with your meal ?


For many years, the offer of wine lists in the restaurants has been an obligation more than an opportunity for the owner of the restaurant and difficult to understand for the client

But nowadays things are changing a lot The restaurants discovered the potentialities of the combination of wine with plates, making nice profits on every bottle offered, improving the satisfaction of the customer and much more interesting developments.

Friday, June 15, 2012

Do you know realy everything about Mexican wines ?

If not, look at it here:

Mexican wine profesionals

Discover our profesional website about Mexican wines: restaurants, wineries, sommeliers, wineclubs and other Mexican wine profesionals

 Links

Other websites promote fine wine tasting, other wines etc.


Opinions about Mexican wine
Discover what other discovered in Mexico while visiting the Mexican wine regions

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Mexican wines at the Cancun Riviera

A gala celebrating Mexican cuisine, held Thursday night at the Fiesta Americana Hotel in Cancún, kicked off the first Cancún-Riviera Maya Wine & Food Festival . While many of the chefs and sommeliers who attended the event were from around the world, each dish offered was cooked in honor and in celebration of Mexican cuisine. Attendees tasted ceviche, empanadas, and braised pork while sampling wine from all regions of the globe, but most were clamoring to taste the unique and rarely displayed wines from Mexico.

Interested ? The article continues here: http://www.thedailymeal.com/showcasing-local-wines-canc-n-riviera-maya-wine-food-festival

Monday, June 11, 2012



Some universities in California (US) and in Mexico give training in gastronomy and in enology (wines etc.) or training for sommeliers. Are you interested by this subject ?

Thursday, June 07, 2012

Is there a official Mexican wine classification ?



Discover the official Mexican wine classification which includes three types related to information on the bottles' labels.
  • Varietales
  • Combinadas
  • De Origen

Thursday, May 31, 2012

August . Ensenada, Baja California, Fiesta de Vendimia - Wine Grape Harvest Festival.

 
Taste wine from Mexico's largest and most famous vineyards of the Santo Tomas Valley in this delightful coastal city on the Bahia de Todos Santos. The festival also offers a variety of "comida corridas", traditional Mexican main meals.
A great time of year to enjoy the Pacific coast side of the Baja peninsula.
Look at the detailed program here (in Spanish): http://www.provinoac.org/espanol/calendarioCompleto.php

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Wine festival this summer in Baja California.


The Baja California State Tourism Secretary (SECTURE) and Provino wine committee traveled to Mexico city to present the 20th edition of Fiestas de la Vendimia de Baja California (Baja California wine harvest festival) ,a press conference with key Mexico national media where on hand to cover the event last week.

The article continues here: http://www.discoverbajacalifornia.com/new.php?id=265



Friday, May 04, 2012

Do you want to discover the history of the Mexican wines ?

The Mexicans are the oldest American wine producers. In the pre-Columbian age (before the arrival of the Spanish conquerors) the Indians used the vine to produce a drink to which they added other fruits and honey.
The vines from Europe adapted well to their new environment and were so productive that one could make wine and brandy. The development of the industry was nipped in the bud however when Madrid totally prohibited the making of wine in order to protect Spanish home-grown product.
At the end of the XIX th century, the Concannon family, pioneer in the Californian state (Livermore Valley, US) convinced the Mexican government to take advantage of the viticultural potential of the country and introduced a dozen French vine types and varietals in Mexico
 
Only in the period of stability post-1940 did a modern winemaking industry emerge, helped by rigorous protectionism. There was revived interest in table wines in the twentieth century.

Friday, April 27, 2012

Like to visit the Mexican states where the vineyards are grown, from Baja California to Queretaro, from Coahuila to Durango ?

Discover the seven states in Mexico where the grapes are grown in significant quantities.

  These are
   -   Baja California, Sonora (Wine region North)
   -   Coahuila and Durango, which together form the area of vineyards known as La Laguna (the lake),
   -  Zacatecas, Aguascalientes and Queretaro (Wine region Center).
 
 

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Support Baja Wines    


Located in the northern part of the State of Baja California, the Baja California Wine Country is blessed with some of the most ideal Mediterranean climate for grape growing. There are very few microclimates in Mexico that combine the very unique characteristics of elevation, soil, season, and temperature..


More: http://www.wineriesinbaja.com/





Thursday, April 12, 2012

Wine tasting in the Adobe Shopping Mall in Ensenada.

Roganto and Malagon wineries have formed a partnership with their wine tasting room and wine bar in the Adobe Shopping Mall on First Street in Ensenada. This cozy wine outlet is located inside a modern shopping plaza originally designed for the cruise ship guests who walk along Lopez Mateos (First) with an additional side entrance at #69 Gastelum. Adobe Shopping Plaza is centered between Ruiz and Gastelum at #490 First and features thirty foot tall entrances and ceilings, modern sculptures, artwork, custom jewelry, and specialty gift items. 




Interested ? The article continues here: http://mexicanwinecountrynews.homestead.com/EnsenadaNewTastingRoom.html


Tuesday, April 10, 2012

Do you know the history of Mexican wine production ?

The history of Mexican wine production begins in the 1500s, when Hernan Cortes and his conquistadors exhausted their supply of wine while overthrowing the Aztecs. He ordered the colonists to plant 1000 grapevines for every 100 native “employees.” (Needless to say, “that mensch” is not something you hear people say about Cortes.) The Spanish conquistadors had vines brought over for religious mass, and more likely, wash down their food. With failed attempts to grow grapes in the more tropical regions of Mexico, the first grapes, known as Criolla (the mission grape of California and the Pais grape of Chile), were successfully planted in the Parras Valley of Coahuila. Growing in Puebla and Zacatecas soon followed. The first Mexican wine estate, Casa Madero, was founded in 1597 by Lorenzo Garcia in Santa Maria de los Parras in Coahuila and still exists.

Read more: http://www.snooth.com/region/mexico/#ixzz1pqFCi7oT

Sunday, April 08, 2012

Discover the Mexican wine situation



Mexican wine is fast becoming another success in the international drinks market, following the remarkable popularity attained by Mexican beer. A combination of modern technology and wine-making expertise has resulted in the production ofhigh class wines in Mexico that are rapidly breaking into international markets


Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Food & Wine Festival in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo – Wait, Mexican WINE?!

I was invited to the Sips of the South event, promoting the Food and Wine Festival, held in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo this year. When I heard it was about sampling Mexican wines and liquors, my interest was piqued.  I mean, who the heck goes to Mexico for wine?


Friday, March 09, 2012

Want to buy Mexican Wine somewhere ?


It is sometimes hard for us to know precisely where you live and thus where you want to buy Mexican wines. This article give you already some hints.
On other pages of our website  you will also find more usefull information.

 
  • The wineclubs in Mexico mostly have a wine shop or a sales activity that can be of your interest. Look here for a complete list of them.
  • Another way to get Mexican wine is contacting each individual winery in Mexico. You will find their complete contact data (addresses, phones, e-mail etc) on this webpage.

Tuesday, March 06, 2012

New Web Site Features the Best of Mexican Wine and Food


'Vino-Tourism' by Steve Dryden

Mexico’s silent revolution in creating premium wine and artisan gourmet cuisine served at fine Baja California restaurants is being exposed to international wine and food lovers thanks to my columns in the Baja Times and on MexiData.info, and now via a new web site: "Baja Wine and Cuisine."

For the last six years we’ve been promoting the wine culture of Baja California with our wine and artisan gourmet food columns, but due to the global economic downturn we’ve been limited in market exposure. With several folks cloning or copying our efforts, we decided to build a web page that would inform local, national and international wine and food lovers about our region on a global level.

Interested ? The article continues here: http://mexidata.info/id2679.html




Saturday, March 03, 2012

Where can you buy Mexican wine ?

Where can you buy Mexican wine in Mexico and in the US ? How to buy these wines on the Internet ?  Look hereafter for interesting addresses:
Wines from Casa de Piedra
Buy through the Internet here: http://www.vinoscasadepiedra.com/venta-vinos.htm
Winery Monte Xanic
Buy through the Internet here:http://www.montexanic.com.mx/catalogo.htm
Wines from the winery Chateau Camou
Here you can find them: http://www.chateau-camou.com.mx/
Want to Buy Chateau Camou wines in the USA ? Here are some addresses.Buy wines from México in the US here

Friday, March 02, 2012

Discover the mexican vineyards of Queretaro in Mexico

This area covers the states of Aguascalientes, Zacatecas and Queretaro. The vineyards in Queretaro are distributed in the San Juan del Rio and Tequisquiapan Valleys.

Interested ? More here: http://mexicanwines.homestead.com/REGIONCenter.html

Wednesday, February 01, 2012

Mexican Wine, No Joke


Mexico has got tequila-making down pat, and it does pretty well with beer-brewing too. Why not add winemaking to the list?
Recently, I spent an afternoon with an old friend whom most people would describe as a wine snob. I think of him more as having very specific tastes, but let’s just say those tastes run to the high end. I gave him a red wine blind. The day was cold, so the deep, dark richness of the wine was appropriate. He sniffed it and then took a sip and finally said, “Not my kind of wine, but it’s delicious. Is it Spanish?”
“Not even close,” I said. “But you got the language right at least.”
“Argentina?”
“Nope. Mexico.”
Needless to say he was astonished. The wine tasted like nothing he’d had before: It was rich, yet so dry.

Interested ? The article continues here: http://www.chow.com/food-news/55417/mexican-wine-no-joke/

Saturday, January 28, 2012

Explore Mexico's wine country (NY Post)


SEVERED heads. Mass graves. Kidnappings. Drug wars. The grim news pouring out of Mexico these days is starting to make Yemen look like the Italian Riviera.

And so it was with sweaty palms on the steering wheel that I crossed the border last month just south of San Diego, at the start of a visit to the wine country of the Baja peninsula.
I checked the State Department travel warning and learned that, in sketchy places, it’s best to “keep a low profile” and “don’t wear expensive jewelry.”

I rented a “low-profile” black Nissan at the San Diego airport and slipped my Swiss Army watch into my pocket. I thought about buying a sombrero at the border so that I’d blend in with the locals. But the one that caught my eye — lapus lazuli blue with pink fringe — didn’t make me look like a Mexican. It made look like a pinata. So I wore my low-profile yellow “Lion King” baseball cap instead.


Read more: http://www.nypost.com/p/lifestyle/travel/wine_tasting_in_mexico_7A6381ZizfT3ZSY9hoWjyK#ixzz1kmEepCf6

Sunday, January 22, 2012

History of Mexican wines 4/4




Chapter 4: After the second World War

Only in the period of stability post-1940 did a modern winemaking industry emerge, helped by rigorous protectionism. There was revived interest in table wines in the twentieth century. 
 
Interested ? Read more ...>>>

Wednesday, January 18, 2012

History of the Mexican wines 2/4



Chapter 2: The first downturn

The vines from Europe adapted well to their new environment and were so productive that one could make wine and brandy. The development of the industry was nipped in the bud however when Madrid totally prohibited the making of wine in order to protect Spanish home-grown product.

Interested ?  Read more ... >>>

Monday, January 16, 2012

History of the Mexican wines 1/4


Chapter 1: The beginning and the developpment

The Mexicans are the oldest American wine producers. In the pre-Columbian age (before the arrival of the Spanish conquerors) the Indians used the vine to produce a drink to which they added other fruits and honey.

Interested ?  Read more ... >>>

Monday, January 02, 2012

Vine and red wine varietals





Discover here the wine grapes and varietals of vines raised by the Mexican wineries. There is a list of vines at the left and of wineries at the right. These wine grapes can be used for sole varietals wines in Mexico.