Monday, December 29, 2008

Mexican wine visits Bay Area


A growing number of Mexicans and Mexican Americans are enjoying wine, though if you want to enjoy Mexican wine you have to travel to Mexico. A recent event in Napa gave Bay Area people a rare taste of Mexican wine, which is not available in Northern California. The event, hosted at COPIA, attracted more than 500 people who sampled wine from 14 Mexican wineries.

All of the wineries at the event are located in the Guadalupe Valley in Baja California, where most of Mexico's wine is produced. The wine-growing region 67 miles southeast of San Diego has a long history of winemaking dating back almost 200 years. First settled by the Kiliwa and Kumiai native people, Spanish missionaries, settlers from other parts of Mexico, and immigrants from Russia and Europe created the unique character of the valley. Today the wine region is home to 27 wineries, ranging from small family operations to the largest, L.A. Cetto, which produces 600,000 cases a year and exports to 26 countries.


The Napa event also featured Mexican food, musical performances, and a panel of winemakers from both the Napa Valley and the Guadalupe Valley to address the question, "Is Guadalupe Valley the Napa Valley of the 1970s?" Future growth of the Guadalupe Valley and its wines was discussed in relation to the strict regulations the United States (especially California) and Mexico has on importing alcohol. Current laws greatly limit the importing of wines between the two countries, whether by distributors or individuals. Many people visiting Mexico would like to see higher limits on the alcoholic beverages they are allowed to bring home. Currently, California residents can bring only one liter of wine back from Mexico.

While L.A. Cetto and a few other large wineries export their wines, the Baja wineries are not very interested in becoming large, global brands. The great interest in Mexican wines among Bay Area people is probably not enough for the wineries to work through government regulations and expand their production for export to more markets. Like many smaller winemakers in California, the Baja winemakers say that they aren't willing to compromise their wine or their business in order to compete in larger markets. For Bay Area wine lovers, a trip to Baja may be the only way to satisfy their curiosity and taste.

Source: visionhispanausa.com

The Essential Valle de Guadalupe food and wine!



It was another divine couple of days in Baja last weekend.The food, the wine, the people, the scenery.It has now been about 8 years or so since I've been traveling regularly to Tijuana, Ensesenada, and the Valle de Guadalupe.Occasionally Rosarito, and two trips driving all the way to Loreto.Much has changed.

I've also been in a couple of discourses on wine and food in the Valle de Guadalupe here and on the wine board in the past 7 months which got me to thinking recently,thanks ibstatguy and dnamj! "Just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in" What is the Valle de Guadalupe and Mexican wine?This is the question that drives the restauranteurs, vintners,chilango wine enthusiasts, journalists,quesotraficos, tourists, and adventurers alike.In Polanco, it's about the boutique and cult Mexican wines.Do you have any Tres Mujeres?Casa de Piedra? For the American media it's Laja, Monte Xanic,Adobe Guadalupe, and Cetto.I mean, every article sends you to the same five places!

Currently, I count 34 wineries in the Valle de Guadalupe(Francisco Zarco,El Porvenir),San Antonio de Las Minas(sub apellation), Ensenada, Santo Tomas, and Ojos Negros.There are an equal number in development in the Valle according to my friend Steve Dryden(Baja Times wine writer/D.F. columnists), and there are people making table wines from their own backyards being sold in restaurants and shops.Yet, where does everyone go?Cetto, Domecq,Santo Tomas,Monte Xanic, Chateau Camou, or Adobe Guadalupe.Where do they eat?Laja.Where do they stay?Adobe Guadalupe or La Villa del Valle.The report, so-so wines, great meal at Laja, wine was expensive, brought my own, I can find better wines cheaper....


Continued here: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/578501

Discover with Mexican Wines the winery Freixenet; Spanish Cava wine legacy


In 1978, a Catalana company, bought some land to establish a winery in the north of Tequisquiapan, in the Mexican state of Querétaro; a good land for vineyards of Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Macabeu, among others. In 1984, they bottled their first following the traditional method of Champenoise. The 10th November (what a beautiful date hehehe, those that dont know me, it´s my birthday!) 1986 (not the year i was born…i wish tho!) was officially opened the winery of Freixenet in México, with a new name called “Finca Doña Dolores”

In 1977, the Catalán José Antonio Llaquet took the management of Freixenet de México as manager and enologist. With his wife as PR made this winery a successful one. Since then, the quality and name of their wines has been growing.

Now with the management of Jordi G. Fos, Enologist by profession and an experience of more than 18 years producing “Cava” and wines in Cataluña, the Alt Penedés zone, the winery is starting a new phase with renovated energy and many new ideas.

Continued here: http://jszolliker.com/2008/12/freixenet/

Thursday, December 25, 2008

A Little Taste of Baja in a Bottle


By Bill Garlough

With May approaching, we don our sombreros as we head south of the border for the celebration of Cinco de Mayo. While margaritas and beer are the typical beverages of choice, wine also offers an interesting pairing with Mexican cuisine.

As winter continued to linger, my wife and I recently fled to Mexico for a warm change of pace. Besides better weather, Mexico offers world-class culture and cuisine. Mexico has significant history behind its wine industry, as it has the oldest wineries in the new world. The Spaniards established grape growing and wineries in the sixteenth century, as they colonized this part of the new world. The majority of grapes

Continues here: http://salsa-recipe.com/a-little-taste-of-baja-in-a-bottle/

Tuesday, December 23, 2008

News about the Mexican wines industry



The Mexican wines industry has centuries of roots, when the Spanish conquered our land and brought their vines to the new world, but when the high quality of the wines produced in this far lands reached the ears of the King in Spain, fearing a competition from the colonies in America, the King decreed a prohibition to harvest grapes and produce wine, except for those wineries that were producing wines for the Church. This prohibition went on until México became independent from Spain in 1810.
The development of the industry was interrupted by laws, revolutions and crisis that delayed it for many many years. Now we are on the road again, still a long long road to learn ahead, but we are doing it pretty well.

Where can we position the wine industry in México? Really hard to tell, because there are many factors involved: private inversion, quality, accessibility, sustainability, diversity, high taxes, small productions and permits and a tremendous price competition compared to the wines of foreign countries.

It is a fact that there is a demand of a more interested and exigent consumer, but also a fast growing crowd of new consumers in México; young people without prejudgments and a palate that is not used or biased to a certain type of wine.

All this gives the Oenologists a freedom that has enriched the wine offer in México.
México does not have a “signature” vine like Australia and their Shiraz, Argentina and their Malbec, Chile and it´s Carmenere or South Africa and its´Pinotage.
México has more than one outstanding grape and not one, but many micro-climates and soils.

Diverse wines, diverse styles; just as the diversity of wineries and the interpretation of their oenologists. Each with it´s own philosophy, it´s own project, it´s own formula, it´s very particular understanding of the terroir, the vine, their dreams and themselves.
Each one driving it´s own oenologic project depending on the understanding of their client, or their own passion and personality.

Continues here: http://liberateyourminds.blogspot.com/2008/12/mexican-wine-industry.html

The Essential Valle de Guadalupe food and wine!


It was another divine couple of days in Baja last weekend.The food, the wine, the people, the scenery.It has now been about 8 years or so since I've been traveling regularly to Tijuana, Ensesenada, and the Valle de Guadalupe.Occasionally Rosarito, and two trips driving all the way to Loreto.Much has changed.

I've also been in a couple of discourses on wine and food in the Valle de Guadalupe here and on the wine board in the past 7 months which got me to thinking recently,thanks ibstatguy and dnamj! "Just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in" What is the Valle de Guadalupe and Mexican wine?This is the question that drives the restauranteurs, vintners,chilango wine enthusiasts, journalists,quesotraficos, tourists, and adventurers alike.In Polanco, it's about the boutique and cult Mexican wines.Do you have any Tres Mujeres?Casa de Piedra? For the American media it's Laja, Monte Xanic,Adobe Guadalupe, and Cetto.I mean, every article sends you to the same five places!

Currently, I count 34 wineries in the Valle de Guadalupe(Francisco Zarco,El Porvenir),San Antonio de Las Minas(sub apellation), Ensenada, Santo Tomas, and Ojos Negros.There are an equal number in development in the Valle according to my friend Steve Dryden(Baja Times wine writer/D.F. columnists), and there are people making table wines from their own backyards being sold in restaurants and shops.Yet, where does everyone go?Cetto, Domecq,Santo Tomas,Monte Xanic, Chateau Camou, or Adobe Guadalupe.Where do they eat?Laja.Where do they stay?Adobe Guadalupe or La Villa del Valle.The report, so-so wines, great meal at Laja, wine was expensive, brought my own, I can find better wines cheaper.....

There are good wines at these places, but not necessarily on the tastings.Cetto wines are usually the cheapest in a restaurant and a good value wine with dinner, but they do have better wines not on their tastings in a higher price range.Dona Lupe makes organic wines, but her real talent is in the amazing food products she makes not her wines, which are OK.The Camou tasting has a nice blanc de blancs and chardonnay, but the reds are their cheaper offerings, again their best wines aren't part of the tasting.The more expensive Camou and Xanic wines are not on the tastings and are more of a reflection of their potential.There are wineries just like this in California, and anywhere for that matter.

Continues here: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/578501

Wednesday, December 10, 2008

Wednesday, December 03, 2008

Can you help ?



Hello,

My name is Harry Reifschneide. I am a resident of a unique ship called "The World".

I am also a member of the wine committee.

Our ship will be in Mexico starting on February 11 in Tampico
We will be in Mexico until late in February and then back again in late April for over a month on the west coast.

Our Sommelier and wine buyer has asked for my help in identifying some premium wines and potentially arranging for help in getting them to us early in our February stay in Mexico.

Can you help?


Harry Reifschneider
reifer@mac.com
+1-415-462-6374 (US # to Vallarta)
+1-206-661-3224 (US cell)
+52-322-29-407-62 (Mex Cell)
+1-415-373-3701 (MyFax)
+52-322-20-918-60 (home Vallarta)
Paseo de la Marina Sur 385
Shangrila Marina
Torre B, Piso 13-2
Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco
48354 Mexico