Thursday, February 14, 2008

Three fine Mexican Wineries






Bodegas Santo Tomás



Established in 1938, Bodegas Santo Tomás was Mexico’s first commercial winery. It is also one of the largest and has a wide range of products. You are more likely to find the “reserves” in the U.S. and, if you’re lucky, the prized Unicos, which is a blend of cabernet sauvignon and merlot. The wines are varietally correct — i.e., the cab tastes0 like cab — and can give some California wines a run for the money. Reserves are about $15 to $20.



Château Camou



Chateau Camou in the Guadalupe Valley is one of the easier Mexican producers to find in California. Michel Rolland, the traveling French oenologist, consulted here for a while. Chateau Camou has three labels: Château Camou, Flor de Guadalupe and Vinas de Camou. The Flor de Guadalupe Zinfandel ($18) has been surprisingly good in the past, but look for a vintage that is fairly young, as this wine does not age very well. The Gran Vino Tinto Merlot ($30) is also worth seeking.




Monte Xanic



Monte Xanic, also in the Guadalupe Valley, is rumored to be former Mexican President Vincente Fox’s favorite Mexican winery, whatever that means. I often enjoy the Vina Kristel, an inexpensive sauvignon blanc/semillon blend ($12). The winery is also known for their Bordeaux-style red blends.






More information about Mexican wineries ?



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